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Criminal Evidence: Principles and Cases

Criminal Evidence: Principles and Cases 9th Edition

By: Thomas J. Gardner Terry M. Anderson
ISBN-10: 1305801849
/ ISBN-13: 9781305687714
Edition: 9th Edition
Language: English
				
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Ch 1: History and Development of the Law of Criminal Evidence

    • Ch 1: Chapter Contents
    • Ch 1: Learning Objectives
    • Ch 1: Introduction
    • History of the Rules of Evidence
    • Magna Carta and Habeas Corpus
    • The American Declaration of Independence
    • The U.S. Constitution and the American Bill of Rights
    • Basic Rights Under the U.S. Constitution Today
    • Ch 1: Summary
    • Ch 1: Key Terms
    • Ch 1: Key Cases
    • Ch 1: Problems
    • Ch 1: Case Analysis
    • Ch 1: Notes

Ch 2: Important Aspects of the American Criminal Justice System

    • Ch 2: Chapter Contents
    • Ch 2: Learning Objectives
    • Ch 2: Introduction
    • Federalism in the United States
    • The American Adversary System
    • The Adversary System and Battles Over What is Relevant, Reliable, and Competent Evidence
    • The American Accusatorial System
    • Disclosing Information in the Adversary System
    • Civil Commitment: Evidence Needed to Commit a Person who Might be Violent
    • Ch 2: Summary
    • Ch 2: Key Terms
    • Ch 2: Key Cases
    • Ch 2: Problems
    • Ch 2: Case Analysis
    • Ch 2: Notes

Ch 3: Using Evidence to Determine Guilt or Innocence

    • Ch 3: Chapter Contents
    • Ch 3: Learning Objectives
    • Ch 3: Introduction
    • Evaluation and Review of Evidence
    • The Criminal Court Process
    • Pleas a Defendant May Enter to a Criminal Charge
    • The Guilty Plea System, Plea Bargaining, and Victim’s Rights Laws
    • An Offer to Plead Guilty cannot be Used as Evidence If the Offer is Later Withdrawn
    • The Trial
    • Ch 3: Summary
    • Ch 3: Key Terms
    • Ch 3: Key Cases
    • Ch 3: Problems
    • Ch 3: Case Analysis
    • Ch 3: Notes

Ch 4: Direct and Circumstantial Evidence and the Use of Inferences

    • Ch 4: Chapter Contents
    • Ch 4: Learning Objectives
    • Ch 4: Introduction
    • Evidence and Proof
    • The Reasonable Doubt Standard
    • Direct Evidence and Circumstantial Evidence
    • Using Direct and Circumstantial Evidence
    • Proving Corpus Delicti by Direct or Circumstantial Evidence
    • The Sufficiency-of-Evidence Requirement to Justify a Verdict or Finding of Guilt
    • The Use of Presumptions and Inferences
    • Ch 4: Summary
    • Ch 4: Key Terms
    • Ch 4: Key Cases
    • Ch 4: Problems
    • Ch 4: Case Analysis
    • Ch 4: Notes

Ch 5: Witnesses and the Testimony of Witnesses

    • Ch 5: Chapter Contents
    • Ch 5: Learning Objectives
    • Ch 5: Introduction
    • Qualifications Necessary to be a Witness
    • Credibility of Witnesses
    • Constitutional Rights of Defendants Regarding Witnesses
    • Types of Witnesses and Opinion Evidence
    • Direct Examination of Witnesses
    • The Requirements of Relevancy, Materiality, and Competency
    • Redirect Examination and Recross-Examination
    • The Role of the Trial Judge
    • Can a Person Who has been Hypnotized Testify as a Witness?
    • Ch 5: Summary
    • Ch 5: Key Terms
    • Ch 5: Key Cases
    • Ch 5: Problems
    • Ch 5: Case Analysis
    • Ch 5: Notes

Ch 6: Judicial Notice, Privileges of Witnesses, and Shield Laws

    • Ch 6: Chapter Contents
    • Ch 6: Learning Objectives
    • Ch 6: Introduction
    • Judicial Notice in General
    • The Privilege Against Self-Incrimination
    • The Attorney-Client Privilege
    • The Husband-Wife Privilege
    • The Physician-Patient Privilege
    • The Psychotherapist-Patient Privilege
    • The Sexual Assault Counselor’s Privilege and Privileges Covering Other Counselors
    • The Clergy-Penitent Privilege
    • The News Reporter’s Privilege Not to Reveal the Source of the Information
    • Is There a Parent-Child Privilege?
    • The Privilege Concerning the Identity of Informants
    • The Government’s Privilege Not to Reveal Government Secrets
    • Ch 6: Summary
    • Ch 6: Key Terms
    • Ch 6: Key Cases
    • Ch 6: Problems
    • Ch 6: Case Analysis
    • Ch 6: Notes

Ch 7: The Use of Hearsay in the Courtroom

    • Ch 7: Chapter Contents
    • Ch 7: Learning Objectives
    • Ch 7: Introduction
    • Witnesses and the Hearsay Rule
    • The History of the Hearsay Rule
    • What is Hearsay?
    • What is not Hearsay? Federal Rules of Evidence 801(d)(1), 801(d)(2), and 801(d)(2)(E)
    • Ch 7: Summary
    • Ch 7: Key Terms
    • Ch 7: Problems
    • Ch 7: Case Analysis
    • Ch 7: Notes

Ch 8: The Confrontation Clause and Exceptions to the Hearsay Rule

    • Ch 8: Chapter Contents
    • Ch 8: Learning Objectives
    • Ch 8: Introduction
    • Hearsay and the Confrontation Clause
    • The Confrontation Clause After Crawford
    • “Firmly Rooted” Exceptions to the Hearsay Rule
    • The Fresh Complaint and the Outcry Rule
    • Modern Hearsay Exceptions in Child Sexual Abuse Cases
    • Ch 8: Summary
    • Ch 8: Key Terms
    • Ch 8: Key Cases
    • Ch 8: Problems
    • Ch 8: Case Analysis
    • Ch 8: Notes

Ch 9: The Exclusionary Rule

    • Ch 9: Chapter Contents
    • Ch 9: Learning Objectives
    • Ch 9: Introduction
    • The Exclusionary Rule (or the Rule of the Exclusion of Evidence)
    • The Fruit of the Poisonous Tree Doctrine (or the Derivative Evidence Rule)
    • Exceptions to the Fruit of the Poisonous Tree Doctrine
    • The Miranda Rule, Confessions, and the Fruit of the Poisonous Tree Doctrine
    • Many States Have Two Sets of Exclusionary Rules
    • Ch 9: Summary
    • Ch 9: Key Terms
    • Ch 9: Key Cases
    • Ch 9: Problems
    • Ch 9: Case Analysis
    • Ch 9: Notes

Ch 10: Where the Exclusionary Rule Does Not Apply

    • Ch 10: Chapter Contents
    • Ch 10: Learning Objectives
    • Ch 10: Introduction
    • The Limits of the Exclusionary Rule
    • The Exclusionary Rule Does Not Apply to Evidence Obtained in a Private Search by a Private Person
    • The Exclusionary Rule Applies Only in Criminal Cases
    • The Exclusionary Rule Does Not Apply to Evidence Obtained in a Consent Search
    • The Exclusionary Rule Does Not Apply If the Defendant Does Not Have Standing or If No Right of Priva
    • Evidence Obtained from Abandoned Property Will Not Be Suppressed
    • Evidence Discovered in Open Fields Will Not Be Suppressed
    • Evidence Discovered in Good Faith or by Honest Mistake Will Not Be Suppressed
    • Other Areas Where the Exclusionary Rule Does Not Apply
    • Ch 10: Summary
    • Cross-References to Other Chapters
    • Ch 10: Key Terms
    • Ch 10: Key Cases
    • Ch 10: Problems
    • Ch 10: Case Analysis
    • Ch 10: Notes

Ch 11: “Special Needs” and Administrative Searches

    • Ch 11: Chapter Contents
    • Ch 11: Learning Objectives
    • Ch 11: Introduction
    • Special Needs and the Fourth Amendment
    • Security Screening at Airports, Courthouses, and Other Public Buildings and Places
    • Fire, Health, and Housing Inspections
    • School Searches on Reasonable Suspicion
    • Drug Testing Without Probable Cause or a Search Warrant
    • Searches Without Probable Cause or Search Warrants of Closely Regulated Businesses
    • Work-Related Searches in Government Offices (the Ortega Rule)
    • Roadblocks or Vehicle Checkpoint Stops
    • Correctional Programs, Hearings, or Requirements That May Cause a Prison Inmate to Incriminate Himse
    • Other Special Government Needs Where Neither Probable Cause nor Search Warrants Are Needed
    • Ch 11: Summary
    • Ch 11: Key Terms
    • Ch 11: Key Cases
    • Ch 11: Problems
    • Ch 11: Case Analysis
    • Ch 11: Notes

Ch 12: Obtaining Statements and Confessions for Use as Evidence

    • Ch 12: Chapter Contents
    • Ch 12: Learning Objectives
    • Ch 12: Introduction
    • Confessions
    • Can a Confession Alone Sustain a Criminal Conviction?
    • The Requirement That Confessions and Incriminating Statements Be Voluntary
    • The Miranda Requirements
    • Silence, Miranda, and Impeachment
    • The Sixth Amendment Right to Counsel and the Massiah Limitation
    • The Bruton Rule
    • Questioning People in Jail or Prison, Including Using Informants and Undercover Agents
    • Polygraph Test Results as Evidence
    • Voice Spectrography Evidence
    • Ch 12: Summary
    • Ch 12: Key Terms
    • Ch 12: Key Cases
    • Ch 12: Problems
    • Ch 12: Case Analysis
    • Ch 12: Notes

Ch 13: The Law Governing Identification Evidence

    • Ch 13: Chapter Contents
    • Ch 13: Learning Objectives
    • Ch 13: Introduction
    • Evidence Needed for a Criminal Conviction
    • The Problem of Mistaken Eyewitness Identification
    • U.S. Supreme Court Cases on Showups
    • Determining the Reliability of Identification Evidence: The Neil v. Biggers Guidelines
    • The Use of Police Lineups: Changes from the 1960s to the Present
    • Using Photographs to Obtain Identification Evidence
    • Obtaining Identification Evidence by Other Means
    • Courtroom Identification of a Defendant
    • Ch 13: Summary
    • Ch 13: Key Terms
    • Ch 13: Key Cases
    • Ch 13: Problems
    • Ch 13: Case Analysis
    • Ch 13: Notes

Ch 14: Obtaining Physical and Other Evidence

    • Ch 14: Chapter Contents
    • Ch 14: Learning Objectives
    • Ch 14: Introduction
    • Obtaining Physical Evidence from the Person of a Suspect
    • Searches Without Warrants: Detentions and Arrests
    • Obtaining Evidence by Police Entry into Private Premises
    • Obtaining Evidence in Traffic Stops and Vehicle Searches
    • Ch 14: Summary
    • Ch 14: Key Terms
    • Ch 14: Key Cases
    • Ch 14: Problems
    • Ch 14: Case Analysis
    • Ch 14: Notes

Ch 15: Obtaining Evidence by Use of Search Warrants, from Computers, Wiretapping, or Dogs Trained to

    • Ch 15: Chapter Contents
    • Ch 15: Learning Objectives
    • Ch 15: Introduction
    • Search Warrants
    • Obtaining Evidence from Computers
    • Wiretapping and Electronic Surveillance
    • Techniques of Lawful Electronic Surveillance
    • Obtaining Evidence by the Use of Dogs Trained to Indicate an Alert
    • Ch 15: Summary
    • Ch 15: Key Terms
    • Ch 15: Key Cases
    • Ch 15: Problems
    • Ch 15: Case Analysis
    • Ch 15: Notes

Ch 16: The Crime Scene, the Chain of Custody Requirement, and the Use of Fingerprints and Trace Evid

    • Ch 16: Chapter Contents
    • Ch 16: Learning Objectives
    • Ch 16: Introduction
    • Obtaining Evidence from a Crime Scene
    • The Chain of Custody Requirement
    • Fingerprints as Evidence
    • Trace Evidence: The Smallest Things Can Make the Biggest Difference
    • Other Types of Evidence
    • Ch 16: Summary
    • Ch 16: Key Terms
    • Ch 16: Key Cases
    • Ch 16: Problems
    • Ch 16: Case Analysis
    • Ch 16: Notes

Ch 17: Videotapes, Photographs, Documents, and Writings as Evidence

    • Ch 17: Chapter Contents
    • Ch 17: Learning Objectives
    • Ch 17: Introduction
    • Photos and Videotapes as Evidence
    • When is a Warrant Needed to Install and Conduct Videotape Surveillance?
    • Using Photographs as Evidence
    • Using Documents and Writings as Evidence
    • Ch 17: Summary
    • Ch 17: Key Terms
    • Ch 17: Problems
    • Ch 17: Case Analysis
    • Ch 17: Notes

Ch 18: Scientific Evidence

    • Ch 18: Chapter Contents
    • Ch 18: Learning Objectives
    • Ch 18: Introduction
    • The Importance of Scientific Evidence
    • The Admissibility of Scientific Evidence
    • A Few of the Sciences and Scientific Techniques Used in the Criminal Justice System
    • Gunshot Residue Evidence (GSR)
    • Ch 18: Summary
    • Ch 18: Key Terms
    • Ch 18: Key Cases
    • Ch 18: Problems
    • Ch 18: Case Analysis
    • Ch 18: Notes

Appendix A: Sections of the U.S. Constitution

Appendix B: Finding and Analyzing Cases

Appendix C: Federal Rules of Evidence

Glossary

Case Index

Subject Index

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