Testbankszip for study guides

A Guidance Approach for the Encouraging Classroom

A Guidance Approach for the Encouraging Classroom 6th Edition

By: Dan Gartrell
ISBN-10: 1133938930
/ ISBN-13: 9781337342018
Edition: 6th Edition
Language: English
				
					=> All chapters included .
=> Download zip file into your device
=> Dedicated support
=> Affordable pricing 

				
			
secure-stripe-payment-logo.png

TEST BANK

$29

Contact

Digital product.

Front Matter

    • NAEYC Professional Preparation Standards
    • NAEYC Principles of Developmentally Appropriate Practice
    • Dedication
    • Preface
    • AIM AND PURPOSE
    • AGE RANGE ADDRESSED
    • NEW TO THIS EDITION
    • FEATURES
    • SUPPLEMENTS
    • Education CourseMate
    • Instructor’s Manual and Test Bank
    • PowerPoint Presentation Slides
    • ExamView Test Bank
    • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    • ABOUT THE AUTHOR
    • Joint NAEYC/Fred Rogers Center Position Statement on Technology and Interactive Media

PART 1: Foundations of a Guidance Approach

    • CHAPTER 1: The Guidance Tradition
    • Guiding Questions
    • Key Concepts
    • Professional Development Standards
    • BEYOND DISCIPLINE
    • Democratic Life Skills: The Goals of Guidance
    • PIONEERS OF THE GUIDANCE TRADITION
    • John Amos Comenius
    • Johann Pestalozzi and Robert Owen
    • Friedrich Froebel
    • Maria Montessori
    • John Dewey
    • TABLE 1-1: Pioneers of the Guidance Tradition from the Field of Education
    • MID-20TH-CENTURY INFLUENCES: THE DEVELOPMENTAL AND SELF PSYCHOLOGISTS
    • Jean Piaget
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Alfred Adler and the Self Psychologists
    • The Self Psychologists
    • Rudolph Dreikurs
    • Haim Ginott
    • TABLE 1-2: Pioneers in the Guidance Tradition from the Fields of Developmental and Self-Psychology
    • THE 1980S AND OBEDIENCE-BASED DISCIPLINE
    • Effects on Children
    • Effects on Teachers
    • Effects on Parents
    • BEYOND DISCIPLINE TO GUIDANCE
    • Developmentally Appropriate Practice
    • TEACHSOURCE VIDEO CASE
    • Guidance Defined
    • The Goals of Guidance: Democratic Life Skill
    • Guidance and the Conflict Resolution Movement
    • CULTURAL RESPONSIVENESS: GUIDANCE AND CULTURAL DIVERSITY
    • The Problem
    • The Promise
    • FAMILY–TEACHER PARTNERSHIPS: PARENT RELATIONS IN THE GUIDANCE TRADITION
    • Froebel’s Kindergartens
    • Montessori’s Children’s Houses
    • The Nursery School Movement
    • Head Start
    • Later Generation Preschool Programs
    • SUMMARY
    • FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITIES
    • Discussion Activity
    • Application Activities
    • RECOMMENDED READINGS
    • GUIDANCE MATTERS: The Case of Jeremiah, January 2006
    • To Increase Your Knowledge
    • Try These Techniques with Children You Find Challenging
    • A Step You Can Take:
    • Column References
    • CHAPTER 2: Child Development, Brain Development, and Guidance
    • Guiding Questions
    • Key Concepts
    • Professional Development Standards
    • PIAGET: A FOUNDATION FOR THE STUDY OF CHILD DEVELOPMENT
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Developmental Egocentrism
    • Prosocial Preschoolers
    • Piaget’s Concept of Autonomy
    • VYGOTSKY: HOW THE ADULT GUIDES DEVELOPMENT
    • TEACHSOURCE VIDEO CASE
    • Zone of Proximal Development
    • Scaffolding
    • The Role of Peers
    • Private Speech
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Private Speech and Emotions Management
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • ERIKSON: PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT AND THE CLASSROOM
    • TABLE 2-1
    • Trust versus Mistrust—Birth to 18 Months
    • Separation Anxiety
    • Autonomy versus Shame and Doubt—18 Months to 42 Months
    • Initiative versus Guilt—42 Months to 6 Years
    • Initiative and Belonging
    • Industry versus Inferiority—6 Years to 12 Years
    • Practices That Promote Industry
    • GARDNER’S MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES: EDUCATION FOR HEALTHY DEVELOPMENT
    • Multiple Intelligences: An Integrative Theory
    • TABLE 2-2: Multiple Intelligences Identified by Gardner
    • Implications for Education
    • The Matter of Assessment
    • Multiple Intelligences and Early Childhood Education
    • TABLE 2-3: Educational Practices That Foster Multiple Intelligences
    • Multiple Intelligences and Guidance
    • Intrapersonal Intelligence
    • Interpersonal Intelligence
    • EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE: DEFINING THE CENTRAL GUIDANCE ISSUE
    • Emotional Intelligence and Challenging Behavior
    • BRAIN DEVELOPMENT AND NURTURING RELATIONSHIPS*
    • Brain Development in Young Children
    • Brain Research and Early Childhood Education
    • CULTURAL RESPONSIVENESS: GUIDANCE IN A DIVERSE SOCIETY
    • FAMILY-TEACHER PARTNERSHIPS: A CLIMATE FOR PARTNERSHIPS WITH FAMILIES
    • Before School Begins
    • After Start-Up
    • First Day
    • First-Night Phone Call
    • Settling In
    • Greeting Meetings
    • Surveys
    • SUMMARY
    • FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITIES
    • Discussion Activity
    • Application Activities
    • RECOMMENDED READINGS
    • GUIDANCE MATTERS: Competition: What Place in Our Programs?, March 2007
    • Emotional Readiness First
    • Life’s Conflicts and Resolutions
    • When Winning Is Losing
    • To Increase Your Knowledge
    • Steps You Can Take
    • Column References
    • CHAPTER 3: Mistaken Behavior: Understanding Conflicts, Aggression, and Challenging Behavior
    • Guiding Questions
    • Key Concepts
    • Professional Development Standards
    • BEYOND MISBEHAVIOR
    • THE CONCEPT OF MISTAKEN BEHAVIOR
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • RELATIONAL PATTERNS: A MODEL FOR SOCIAL-EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT
    • THREE LEVELS OF MISTAKEN BEHAVIOR
    • Common Sources of Motivation
    • TABLE 3-1: Common Sources of Motivation: Relational Patterns and Levels of Mistaken Behavior
    • Level One: Experimentation Mistaken Behavior
    • Uncontrolled Experimentation
    • Controlled Experimentation
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Level Two: Socially Influenced Mistaken Behavior
    • Individual Influence
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Group Influence
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Superheroes and Socially Influenced Mistaken Behavior
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Level Three: Strong Unmet Needs Mistaken Behavior
    • Determining If a Mistaken Behavior Is Level Three
    • Physiological Factors and Level Three Behaviors
    • Emotional Factors and Level Three Behaviors
    • Responding to Level Three Mistaken Behavior
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • TABLE 3-2: Using Comprehensive Guidance to Assist Wendy
    • Visual Summary: Three Levels of Mistaken Behavior
    • TABLE 3-3: Sample Mistaken Behaviors by Level
    • MISTAKEN BEHAVIOR, AGGRESSION, AND CHALLENGING BEHAVIOR
    • Consideration One: Mistaken Behavior Can Be on Purpose
    • Guidance Interventions
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Consideration Two: Aggression Is Mistaken Behavior
    • TABLE 3-4: Aggression in Young Children
    • Aggression and Levels of Mistaken Behavior
    • Aggression at Level One
    • Aggression at Level Two
    • Aggression at Level Three
    • Consideration Three: Challenging Behavior is Mistaken Behavior
    • CULTURAL RESPONSIVENESS: CULTURAL FACTORS AND MISTAKEN BEHAVIOR
    • FAMILY PARTNERSHIPS: COMMUNICATING WITH PARENTS ABOUT MISTAKEN BEHAVIOR
    • Tips for Talking with Parents about Their Children*
    • SUMMARY
    • FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITIES
    • Discussion Activity
    • Application Activities
    • RECOMMENDED READINGS
    • GUIDANCE MATTERS: Swearing and Words That Hurt—Three Anecdotes, November 2007
    • Sherry: Experimentation
    • Thad: Socially Influenced Hurting Words
    • Wayne: Strong Unmet Needs
    • To Increase Your knowledge
    • A Step You Can Take
    • Column References
    • CHAPTER 4: Guidance in the Classroom
    • Guiding Questions
    • Key Concepts
    • Professional Development Standards
    • A PROFESSIONAL, NOT A TECHNICIAN
    • Learning While Teaching
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • The Need for Positive Teacher-Child Relationships
    • Institutional Dynamics That Work Against Relationships
    • TEACHSOURCE VIDEO CASE
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Avoid Labeling
    • But “I Just Don’t Like That Kid”
    • Unconditional Positive Regard—Communicating to Protect Self Esteem
    • Long-Term Benefits
    • REDUCING THE NEED FOR MISTAKEN BEHAVIOR
    • The Challenges of Childhood
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • The Match of the Child and the Program
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Improving the Match
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • TAKING A SOLUTION ORIENTATION
    • Conflict Management
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Guidance Talks
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Class Meetings
    • Crisis Management Techniques
    • Requesting a Choice
    • Calming
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Cool-Down Time
    • Passive Restraint
    • LIBERATION TEACHING
    • Accepting Our Humanness
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • CULTURAL RESPONSIVENESS: THE INFLUENCE OF POVERTY
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • FAMILY PARTERNSHIPS: OVERCOMING OBSTACLES
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • SUMMARY
    • FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITIES
    • Discussion Activity
    • Application Activities
    • RECOMMENDED READINGS
    • GUIDANCE MATTERS: From Rules to Guidelines: Moving to the Positive, January 2012
    • The Problem with Rules
    • Toward Guidelines
    • Class Meetings
    • Toward the Positive
    • References

PART 2: Creating the Encouraging Classroom

    • CHAPTER 5: Organizing the Encouraging Classroom
    • Guiding Questions
    • Key Concepts
    • Professional Development Standards
    • PREVENTING SCHOOL ANXIETY: THE ENCOURAGING CLASSROOM
    • TEACHSOURCE VIDEO CASE
    • The Encouraging Classroom
    • DEVELOPMENTALLY APPROPRIATE PRACTICE TODAY
    • TABLE 5-1: Increasing Appropriate Practice to Reduce Mistaken Behavior
    • School Readiness and Play
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Accommodate the Active Nature of Young Children
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Active Learning in the Natural World*
    • Outdoor Example
    • Technology in the Early Childhood Classroom
    • DAP in the Primary Grades
    • Classroom Illustration
    • Classroom Illustration
    • Working Together for Change
    • Classroom Illustration
    • Role of the Principal
    • LEARNING CENTERS IN THE ENCOURAGING CLASSROOM
    • Organizing Learning Centers
    • 1. Consider Traffic Patterns and Noise Levels
    • TABLE 5-2: Range of Noise Levels in Typical Centers Using the 3B System
    • 2. Build Centers Around the Interests of Children
    • Classroom Illustration
    • 3. Be Creative in Center Set-up
    • 4. Establish Routines for Center Selection
    • 5. Encourage Creativity for Brain Development
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • 6. Provide Ample Center Time to Kindle Mastery Motivation
    • Centers at the Primary Level
    • A Model for Center-Based Instruction
    • BUILDING THE CLASSROOM FOR PROSOCIAL DEVELOPMENT
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • CULTURAL RESPONSIVENESS: POVERTY, GUIDANCE, AND LINGUISTIC COMPETENCE
    • FAMILY PARTNERSHIPS: ENCOURAGING FAMILY ENGAGEMENT WITH THE PROGRAM
    • Ways Family Members Can Engage in the Preschool or Primary-Grade Program
    • Helping Volunteers Feel Comfortable
    • SUMMARY
    • FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITIES
    • Discussion Activity
    • Application Activities
    • RECOMMENDED READINGS
    • GUIDANCE MATTERS: Promote Physical Activity—It’s Proactive Guidance, March 2008
    • Rough-and-Tumble Play
    • Melding Movement and Learning
    • To Increase Your Knowledge
    • Steps You Can Take
    • Column References
    • CHAPTER 6: Managing the Encouraging Classroom
    • Guiding Questions
    • Key Concepts
    • Professional Development Standards
    • THE DAILY PROGRAM
    • Three Sample Schedules
    • TABLE 6-1: Prekindergarten Schedule
    • TABLE 6-2: Kindergarten Schedule
    • TABLE 6-3: Primary Schedule
    • Tracking the Daily Schedule
    • TEACHSOURCE VIDEO CASE
    • The Need of Young Children for Physical Activity
    • Building Physical Activity into the Daily Program
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Rest and Relaxation
    • TABLE 6-4: Fingertip Guide to Happy Napping
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • THE LIMITS OF LARGE GROUPS
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Taking Attendance
    • Calendar and the Weather
    • Make the Sharing Real
    • Show-and-Tell
    • Using Stories with Children
    • Encouraging Appreciation
    • Encouraging Personal Expression
    • Discussing Inclusively
    • TABLE 6-5: Top Ten Techniques for Encouraging Early Literacy Engagement Through Books and Stories (Late Show with David Letterman style)
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Stories Help Integrate Curriculum
    • A Place for Large Groups
    • Classroom Illustration
    • MANAGING TRANSITIONS
    • Waiting
    • Pre-Primary Buffer Activities
    • Primary-Level Buffer Activities
    • Learning to Live with Lines
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • ROUTINES IN THE ENCOURAGING CLASSROOM: A TEACHER’S PERSPECTIVE
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • CULTURAL RESPONSIVENESS: THE GUIDANCE APPROACH WITH EMERGENT BILINGUAL LEARNERS
    • Linguistic Advantages
    • Cognitive Advantages
    • Neurological Advantages
    • FAMILY PARTNERSHIPS: ENCOURAGING AND SUPPORTING CLASSROOM VOLUNTEERS
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Helping Volunteers Feel Welcome
    • First Visits
    • Special Events Volunteers
    • When a Family Member Stirs a Child’s Emotions
    • Regular Volunteers
    • SUMMARY
    • FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITIES
    • Discussion Activity
    • Application Activities
    • RECOMMENDED READINGS
    • GUIDANCE MATTERS: A Concerned Director Writes, November 2005
    • A Successful Outcome
    • The Heart of Guidance
    • The Role of Teachers
    • Teaching the Whole Child
    • To Increase Your Knowledge
    • A Step You Can Take
    • CHAPTER 7: Leadership Communication with the Group
    • Guiding Questions
    • Key Concepts
    • Professional Development Standards
    • ESTABLISHING LEADERSHIP
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Using Guidance to Teach Routines
    • Classroom Illustration
    • TEACHSOURCE VIDEO CASE
    • GUIDELINES, NOT RULES
    • Logical Consequences
    • The Benefits of Guidelines
    • Guidelines at Different Age Levels
    • Creating Guidelines
    • ENCOURAGEMENT, MORE THAN PRAISE
    • Public Encouragement/Private Encouragement
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Public Encouragement, Directed to the Group
    • Private Encouragement, Directed to the Individual
    • Encouragement—What to Say
    • TABLE 7-1: Encouragement Acknowledges Effort and Progress
    • Stickers and Smiley Faces: Basically Bribes
    • When Praise Is Appropriate
    • DISCUSSING INCLUSIVELY
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • When Children Don’t Listen
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • CLASS MEETINGS: SUSTAINING THE ENCOURAGING CLASSROOM
    • Class Meetings/Magic Circles
    • Three Types of Class Meetings
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Holding Class Meetings
    • Morning Meetings
    • Going Home Meetings
    • Meeting to Solve Problems
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Meetings with Toddlers—The Biting Issue
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Class Meetings and Level Three Mistaken Behaviors
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Getting Class Meetings Started
    • ENCOURAGING FRIENDLINESS
    • Friendships and Friendliness
    • Addressing Cliques and Squabbling
    • Being Friends and/or Being Friendly?
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • How One Teacher Brought Friendliness to Her Classroom
    • CULTURAL RESPONSIVENESS: TURNING DISCRIMINATORY REMARKS MADE BY CHILDREN INTO LEARNING EXPERIENCES
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • FAMILY-TEACHER PARTNERSHIPS: LEADERSHIP COMMUNICATION WITH PARENTS
    • Written Notes
    • DIGITAL COMMUNICATION
    • E-Mail, Text Messaging, Etc.
    • Websites
    • Telephone Calls
    • Answering Machines/Recorded Messages
    • Family Meetings
    • TABLE 7-2: Suggestions for Successful Family Meetings
    • SUMMARY
    • FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITIES
    • Discussion Activity
    • Application Activities
    • RECOMMENDED READINGS
    • GUIDANCE MATTERS: The Beauty of Class Meetings, November 2006
    • To Increase Your Knowledge
    • A Step You Can Take
    • Column References
    • CHAPTER 8: Leadership Communication with the Individual
    • Guiding Questions
    • Key Concepts
    • Professional Development Standards
    • 1. CAREFUL LISTENING
    • Classroom Illustration
    • TABLE 8-1: Analysis: Listening Techniques That Build Relationships
    • TEACHSOURCE VIDEO CASE
    • Listening to Life Experiences
    • Listening for School-Related Stress
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Listening for Stress Related to the Home and Neighborhood
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Listening Beyond the Behavior
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Using Greetings to Read Children’s Feelings
    • Classroom Illustration
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • CONTACT TALK
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Contact Talks at the Preschool Level
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • The Challenge of Finding the Time
    • Contact Talks in the Primary Grades
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • THE COMPLIMENT SANDWICH
    • TABLE 8-2: Compliment Sandwiches at Preprimary and Primary Levels
    • FRIENDLY HUMOR
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • FRIENDLY TOUCH
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • GUIDANCE MEANS LEADERSHIP WITH OTHER ADULTS
    • Team-Teaching
    • The Teaching Team
    • Strengths of the Teaching Team Model
    • Working with Other Professionals
    • BE THERE FOR THE CHILDREN, BE THERE FOR YOURSELF
    • TABLE 8-3: Suggestions for Reducing Stress in the Classroom Community
    • CULTURAL RESPONSIVENESS: FOSTERING INCLUSIVE SOCIAL IDENTITIES
    • FAMILY PARTNERSHIPS: LEADERSHIP COMMUNICATION IN THE PARENT-TEACHER CONFERENCE
    • Preparing for the Conference
    • Conducting the Conference
    • Listening to Parents
    • Follow-Up
    • SUMMARY
    • FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITIES
    • Discussion Activity
    • Application Activities
    • RECOMMENDED READINGS
    • GUIDANCE MATTERS: Aggression, the Prequel: Preventing the Need, November 2011
    • The neuroscience of attachment
    • Application
    • Column References

PART 3: Solving Problems in the Encouraging Classroom

    • CHAPTER 9: Conflict Management
    • Guiding Questions
    • Key Concepts
    • Professional Development Standards
    • BASICS OF CONFLICT MANAGEMENT
    • Basic Term Soup
    • Managing One’s Feelings
    • Six Guidelines for Conflict Management
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Guideline One: The teacher calms down all parties before starting
    • Guideline Two: The teacher intervenes fair-mindedly, not as a moral authority but as a democratic leader
    • Guideline Three: As mediator, the teacher shares the power
    • Guideline Four: The teacher supports the right of personal expression and the skill of effective communication
    • Guideline Five: The teacher does not impose “solutions”
    • Guideline Six: The teacher need not mediate perfectly for children to learn conflict management skills
    • DEVELOPMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS IN CONFLICT MANAGEMENT
    • Peace Props
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • THE FIVE-FINGER FORMULA
    • TABLE 9-1: The Five-Finger Formula for Conflict Management
    • Mediate “Every Time”?
    • Mediating by the Five-Finger Formula
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Two Potholes
    • TABLE 9-2: Communication Techniques That Avoid the “Blaming” Pothole
    • Classroom Anecdote (Synopsis)
    • TEACHING CONFLICT MANAGEMENT SKILLS
    • Illustrating the Levels: Three Conflict Management Examples
    • High-Level Mediation
    • Classroom Anecdote (High-Level Mediation)
    • Defining the Problem
    • Reaching a Solution
    • Bringing Successful Closure
    • Low-Level Mediation
    • Classroom Anecdote (Low-Level Mediation)
    • Defining the Problem
    • Reaching a Solution
    • Bringing Successful Closure
    • Child Negotiation
    • Classroom Anecdote (Child Negotiation)
    • Defining the Problem
    • Reaching a Solution
    • Bringing Successful Closure
    • CULTURAL RESPONSIVENESS/FAMILY PARTNERSHIPS: UNDERSTANDING FOUR DIMENSIONS OF DIVERSITY IN TODAY’S FAMILIES
    • Single-Father Families
    • What Early Childhood Professionals Can Do
    • Grandparents Raising Grandchildren
    • What Early Childhood Professionals Can Do
    • Teens Raising Children
    • What Early Childhood Professionals Can Do
    • When Families Are Homeless
    • What Early Childhood Professionals Can Do
    • SUMMARY
    • FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITIES
    • Discussion Activity
    • Application Activities
    • RECOMMENDED READINGS
    • GUIDANCE MATTERS: A Five-Step Process for Conflict Mediation, June/July 2010
    • The Technique at Work
    • CHAPTER 10: Problem Solving Mistaken Behavior
    • Guiding Questions
    • Key Concepts
    • Professional Development Standards
    • THE DECISION TO INTERVENE
    • With-it-ness
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • When to Intervene
    • Marginal Mistaken Behaviors
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • TABLE 10-1: The Decision to Intervene: Two Quick Reality Checks
    • Bossiness
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Arguments
    • TABLE 10-2: Problem Solving Classroom Arguments with Children Aged Three to Eight
    • Classroom Illustration
    • Degrees of Firmness in the Intervention
    • Choices
    • In-Choices and Out-Choices
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • FOUR QUICK INTERVENTION STRATEGIES
    • Negotiation Reminders
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Sentence Frames
    • Humor as Tension Reliever
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Nonverbal Techniques
    • Explain Concisely
    • Classroom Illustration
    • TABLE 10-3: Examples of Encouragement with Direction to Briefly Reinforce Guidelines
    • BEHAVIORS REPORTED BY OTHER CHILDREN
    • Motives for Child-Reports
    • TABLE 10-4: Teacher Responses to Child-Report
    • Why Bother
    • INTERVENTION STRATEGIES WHEN FOLLOW-UP IS NEEDED
    • Guidance Talks
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Reflective Listening
    • TABLE 10-5: Reflective Listening to Teach Self-Calming and Impulse Management
    • Teacher-Child Negotiation
    • Including Children’s Ideas
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Reconciliation
    • WHY TAKE THE TIME?
    • A Matter of Ethics
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • The Code of Ethical Conduct
    • CULTURAL COMPETENCE/FAMILY PARTNERSHIPS:
    • Building Cooperation with Today’s Diverse Families
    • Step One: Monitor Your Feelings Toward the Family
    • Step Two: Understand Parent Development
    • Step Three: Choose Words That Avoid Value Judgments
    • Step Four: Problem Solve with Families
    • Step Five: Use Support Services
    • SUMMARY
    • FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITIES
    • Discussion Activity
    • Application Activities
    • RECOMMENDED READINGS
    • GUIDANCE MATTERS: Boys and Men Teachers, May 2006
    • Teacher Bruce and Darnell
    • Teacher Jay and Scott
    • To Increase Your Knowledge:
    • A Step You Can Take
    • Column References
    • CHAPTER 11: Guidance through Intervention
    • Guiding Questions
    • Key Concepts
    • Professional Development Standards
    • WHEN BOYS HAVE CONFLICTS
    • Culture Clash
    • Gender Gap in Teachers
    • Boy-Friendly Classrooms
    • Intervention Considerations
    • WHEN CONFLICTS MAKE INTERVENTION NECESSARY
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Teaching for Emotions Management
    • CRISIS MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES
    • TABLE 11-1: Four Crisis Management Techniques
    • First Alternative: Being Direct
    • 1. Describe without Labeling
    • 2. Express Displeasure without Insult
    • 3. Correct by Direction
    • Using the Ideas Together
    • Second Alternative: Commanding a Choice
    • In-Choice and Out-Choice Considerations
    • Third Alternative: Calm, Then Teach
    • Calming Techniques
    • Separating to Cool Down
    • Replacing Time-Outs
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Self-Removal
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Last Alternative: Physical Restraint
    • The Passive Bear Hug
    • Monitoring and Reporting
    • COMPREHENSIVE GUIDANCE/THE INDIVIDUAL GUIDANCE PLAN
    • Comprehensive Guidance
    • TABLE 11-2: Steps in Comprehensive Guidance
    • Classroom Illustration
    • The Individual Guidance Plan
    • Response from the Field
    • Recap
    • WHEN TEACHERS FEEL ANGER
    • Monitor Feelings; Make Adjustments
    • Express Anger Carefully
    • Model and Teach Reconciliation
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • A Matter of Timing
    • CULTURAL COMPETENCE/FAMILY-PARENT PARTNERSHIPS: WHEN TEACHERS AND PARENTS DISAGREE
    • SUMMARY
    • FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITIES
    • Discussion Activity
    • Application Activities
    • RECOMMENDED READINGS
    • GUIDANCE MATTERS: Comprehensive Guidance, January 2008
    • Relationship with the Family
    • Individual Guidance Plans
    • Column References
    • To Increase Your Knowledge
    • A Step You Can Take
    • CHAPTER 12: Liberation Teaching: A Guidance Response to Violence in Society
    • Guiding Questions
    • Key Concepts
    • Professional Development Standards
    • SOCIETAL VIOLENCE AND THE CLASSROOM
    • The Violence Pyramid
    • Figure 12–1: The Continuum of Violence in Children’s Lives
    • Assessing the Effects of Violence, by the Levels
    • Level One: Experimentation Mistaken Behavior
    • Level Two: Socially Influenced Mistaken Behavior
    • Level Three: Strong Needs Mistaken Behavior
    • Impact of Direct Violence on the Child
    • Socially Responsive Education
    • LIBERATION TEACHING: THE GUIDANCE RESPONSE
    • Stigma: Negative Separation from the Group
    • Preschool Expulsion
    • Vulnerability Factors for Stigma
    • Liberating Teacher Responses
    • Liberation Teaching and Resiliency
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • A Protective Buffer
    • THE GUIDANCE RESPONSE TO BULLYING
    • Bullying as Levels of Mistaken Behavior
    • Bullying and Liberation Teaching
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • LIBERATION TEACHING AND RELATED EDUCATIONAL PRACTICES
    • The Encouraging Classroom
    • Class Meetings
    • Developmentally Appropriate for Every Child
    • Peace Education
    • Antibias Education and Liberation Teaching
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • CULTURAL COMPETENCE/FAMILY-TEACHER PARTNERSHIPS: LIBERATION TEACHING AND PARENT ENGAGEMENT
    • Level One—Accepting Information
    • Level Two—Active Educational Engagement
    • Level Three—Program Participation
    • Family Members in the Classroom
    • TABLE 12-1: Shareable Interests of Family Members in Northern Minnesota (Not Necessarily Tied to Ethnic Roots or Gender Role Stereotypes)
    • Program Engagement Outside of the Classroom
    • Level Four—Personal/Professional Development
    • Classroom Anecdote
    • SUMMARY
    • FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITIES
    • Discussion Activity
    • Application Activities
    • RECOMMENDED READINGS
    • GUIDANCE MATTERS: Understanding Bullying, May 2008
    • Bullying as Physical Aggression
    • Liberation Teaching
    • To Increase Your Knowledge
    • Professional Resources
    • Children’s Literature (Preschool to Grade 3)
    • Websites
    • A Step You Can Take
    • Column References

Back Matter

  • APPENDIX A: The NAEYC* Code of Ethical Conduct
  • PREAMBLE
  • Core Values
  • Conceptual Framework
  • SECTION I: ETHICAL RESPONSIBILITIES TO CHILDREN*
  • Ideals:
  • Principles:
  • SECTION II: ETHICAL RESPONSIBILITIES TO FAMILIES*
  • Ideals:
  • Principles:
  • SECTION III: ETHICAL RESPONSIBILITIES TO COLLEAGUES
  • A—Responsibilities to Co-workers Ideals:
  • Principles:
  • B—Responsibilities to Employers Ideals:
  • Principles:
  • C—Responsibilities to Employees Ideals:
  • Principles:
  • SECTION IV: ETHICAL RESPONSIBILITIES TO COMMUNITY AND SOCIETY
  • Ideals:
  • Principles:
  • The National Association for the Education of Young Children Statement of Commitment*
  • APPENDIX B: Technology and Interactive Media as Tools in Early Childhood Programs Serving Children from Birth through Age 8*
  • STATEMENT OF THE ISSUES
  • Technology and interactive media are here to stay
  • All screens are not created equal
  • There is conflicting evidence on the value of technology in children’s development
  • The appeal of technology can lead to inappropriate uses in early childhood settings
  • Issues of equity and access remain unresolved
  • THE POSITION
  • It is the position of NAEYC and the Fred Rogers Center that:
  • Principles to Guide the Appropriate Use of Technology and Interactive Media as Tools in Early Childhood Programs Serving Children from Birth through Age 8
  • Above all, the use of technology tools and interactive media should not harm children
  • Developmentally appropriate practices must guide decisions about whether and when to integrate technology and interactive media into early childhood programs
  • Professional judgment is required to determine if and when a specific use of technology or media is age appropriate, individually appropriate, and culturally and linguistically appropriate
  • Developmentally appropriate teaching practices must always guide the selection of any classroom materials, including technology and interactive media
  • Appropriate use of technology and media depends on the age, developmental level, needs, interests, linguistic background, and abilities of each child
  • Effective uses of technology and media are active, hands-on, engaging, and empowering; give the child control; provide adaptive scaffolds to ease the accomplishment of tasks; and are used as one of many options to support children’s learning
  • When used appropriately, technology and media can enhance children’s cognitive and social abilities
  • Interactions with technology and media should be playful and support creativity, exploration, pretend play, active play, and outdoor activities
  • Technology tools can help educators make and strengthen home–school connections
  • Technology and media can enhance early childhood practice when integrated into the environment, curriculum, and daily routines
  • Assistive technology must be available as needed to provide equitable access for children with special needs
  • Technology tools can be effective for dual language learners by providing access to a family’s home language and culture while supporting English language learning
  • Digital literacy is essential to guiding early childhood educators and parents in the selection, use, integration, and evaluation of technology and interactive media
  • Early childhood educators need training, professional development opportunities, and examples of successful practice to develop the technology and media knowledge, skills, and experience needed to meet the expectations set forth in this statement
  • Research is needed to better understand how young children use and learn with technology and interactive media and also to better understand any short- and long-term effects
  • RECOMMENDATIONS
  • NAEYC and the Fred Rogers Center recommend that early childhood educators:
  • SUMMARY
  • REFERENCES
  • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
  • APPENDIX C: Individual Guidance Plan Worksheet
  • INDIVIDUAL GUIDANCE PLAN WORKSHEET*
  • Glossary
  • A
  • B
  • C
  • D
  • E
  • F
  • G
  • H
  • I
  • L
  • M
  • N
  • O
  • P
  • R
  • S
  • T
  • U
  • W
  • Z
  • References
  • CHAPTER 1
  • CHAPTER 2
  • CHAPTER 3
  • CHAPTER 4
  • CHAPTER 5
  • CHAPTER 6
  • CHAPTER 7
  • CHAPTER 8
  • CHAPTER 9
  • CHAPTER 10
  • CHAPTER 11
  • CHAPTER 12
  • Index

Resource Type:

Authors:

Reviews

Create a Free Account

* We don’t share your personal info with anyone. Check out our Privacy Policy for more information